Bellevue’s Transportation Facilities Plan, or TFP, is a budget document that outlines the city’s priorities for transportation investments over a 12-year period. In order for an infrastructure project to be given funding when the city decides on the biennial budget and the 7-year Capital Improvement Plan (CIP), the project must be listed in the TFP. That makes the TFP really important by setting the stage for the projects that can then go on to receive funding – and you can have an impact to support more projects towards walking, biking, and transit! Here’s how:

The city is providing two ways for interested parties to provide feedback through the Engaging Bellevue website. First, people can fill out a brief questionnaire by scrolling down on the linked page and clicking on “Take our Survey.”

The quick five-question survey will ask you if you live or work in Bellevue (& if so where) and how you usually get around the city. A robust response from people who regularly walk, cycle, or take transit in the city will remind staff of the importance of investing in truly multimodal infrastructure. And if you want to have even more of an impact, there’s another step you can take to provide more detailed feedback about the exact projects under review. The city has created an interactive map tool to view more details on specific projects & provide comments.

This map may seem confusing at first, but the legend on the right-hand side of the page provides some clarification. What you’re seeing on this page are the slew of pedestrian, bicycle, transit, and roadway projects that have either already been funded (and are therefore less important to provide comment on) and those that are under consideration in this new TFP. To comment on a project, click on its icon on the map and select “Comment on Project”. This will direct you to a Google Form where you can leave feedback.

It is most important to provide positive feedback on the pedestrian, bicycle, and transit candidate projects (including the three Other Candidate Bicycle Project regions). Note that the transit corridor projects correspond to current King County Metro routes — therefore, if you have experiences riding buses on the Eastside and want to see corridor improvements that can help you get around more quickly and comfortably, you might want to provide comments on the following projects, which are in-line with the corresponding routes:

CTP-1 RapidRide B Line
CTP-2 Route 271
CTP-3 Route 241
CTP-4 Route 221 (Crossroads to Overlake)
CTP-5 Route 221 (Crossroads to Eastgate)
CTP-6 Route 245 (Eastgate to Factoria)
CTP-7 Route 245 (Eastgate to Overlake)

If you click on an area with multiple projects, you can use the right arrow to scroll between them, marked below.

Every time you submit a comment form, your feedback is saved, so you can just exit the page when you’re done. I understand this may seem like a lot, but deciding on these projects is really where a lot of the meat of transportation planning happens. I want to personally thank you for taking the time to make Bellevue a safer & more multimodal city! If you have any questions, reach out to me at crandels@cs-bellevue.org.

— Chris

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